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to union city. that traffic is going to be a little bit slow now as you head south. let's go to steve. >>> a very good morning. a little breeze. that's an offshore wind. downtown oakland is 59 -- excuse me. downtown oakland is 60. the airport is 59. there's some areas up in mendocino county, lake county. for some it's mild to warm. for others, cold and patchy. >>> today, sunshine -- >> today, sunshine, lane comes in late, late tus -- late late tuesday, early wednesday. it won't be a lot of rain. nothing like we had a week ago. that's for sure. the cold air is on its way. today, cool, clear, patchy fog. cold to warm. sunny, mild to warm, breezy to windy. some of the higher elevations. a nice weekend and gives way to a nice monday and most, i think about half of tuesday. it's a dry pattern until wednesday and maybe even some low snow levels by the way as we get toward wednesday night. fair field, 30s, santa rosa. oakland, 59 at the airport. dipping below 50 at hayward. oakland/berkeley coming 0 the hills, it's a wind. the gulf alaska is coming into the picture it will be coming right a
. so i think that was a very smart strategic move. >> all right, steve. >> i'll look at the senate level, the smartest move, mccaskill's move, saying you know what i think i want to run against todd aiken, and she quietly helped him get the nomination. the rest is history. not only did it help her race, affect her race she had no business winning, there was obviously a ripple effect that helped democrats nationally. >> chris, the best move of the year? >> i think the best move, joe biden, who answered a question honestly without premeditation and frankly in his "meet the press" interview with david gregory when he was asked about marriage equality. and i think all the reporting afterward, was this a trial balloon, were they trying? no, no, no, joe biden was asked a question and answered with a moral legitimate move, a truthfulness that had these remarkable effects that it pushed the president to come clean about his personal evolution, i think that personally made a difference in the campaign. >> my visual on the campaign, we actually had a visual assist on this. "the washington po
time now. george will is off. glad to have cokie roberts here. also dan senor. steve rattner and two congressmen, congressman tom cole of oklahoma, also a member of the republican leadership, and keith ellison, chair of the progressive caucus. cokie, tim geithner said they're making progress. >> congressman cole does, too. >> i want to hear that. >> but it hasn't been a very encouraging week for people who think that the fiscal cliff is not something that we want to go over and i think that the president's proposal that was put on the table was something that republicans were not going to accept, even close to accept, so it had the air of bizarre. you know, bargaining. but put a really high price out there so that when you start the negotiating -- >> when will the real negotiating begin? congressman cole? >> i want to thank the president and secretary geithner for reuniting and re-energizing the republican caucus. because that offer -- they must think that john boehner is santa claus, because it was a christmas wish list, it wasn't a real proposal. at the end of the day, do i think w
. >> steve calling from dallas the texas. hey, steve. good morning. >> how is it going? >> first up. >> i am a first-time viewer. love the show. >> bill: great to have you on board. thank you. >> i wanted to say, to me, i have no problem with same-sex marriages. my whole thing is this is a subject that just needs to be put to rest. i mean i want to get to the bigger issues, the more issues, which is my economy. i want to know what's going on with that, where we are going to go from here. >> bill: yeah. caller: to me, it's more important than whether jimmy and johnny want to get married. >> bill: steve, i am so glad you said that because i think most americans -- at least more and more americans feel that way. right? let's focus on what's important in our lives. right? caller: it's either that or big bird. >> peter: the big issues. >> bill: all right, steve. good to hear from you. now, let's hear, you know, now that you are with us one day, stick around for a while. barbara on the west coast in seattle, washington, what do you say, barbara? caller: w
and well here. >>> i'm steve kornacki in new york. doesn't matter where you are. we are going to slide down the slope if a deal isn't reached. some faster than others. today, what you don't hear in all of this. straight talk when it comes to your wallet. >>> i'm toure. a big day today. anti-fragile. chaos can be good. oh, we'll make them mad today. >> maybe a little too much chaos for us who's still feeling under the weather, s.e. but we have a whole hour of "the cycle" starting right now. >>> it's basketball thursday here on "the cycle" and we have a classic for you as we relate dr. nasmith to the fiscal whatever here in washington. we take you to washington for last night's cavaliers-wizards game, a classic between the boehner-led cavs at 6-23 against the harry reid wizards at 3-22. pay attention, kornacki. cleveland won. the final was 87-84. this even though cleveland's best player irving missed 9 out of 10 shots in the second half and missed 4 out of 6 free-throws with no one guarding him. >> ouch. >> as for my wizards, four turnovers in the final five minutes falling to 3 wins and 23 l
and "morning joe" economic analyst. steve brattner. >> he came with charts. willie, do you have a chart? >> no. >> he's disturbed. i don't know if you heard this. has he done this to you? >> we have two obesity stories we have to get to. we're not going to break. >> stalling right now. >> the filibuster reform should be passed but not passed yet. our executive producer, alex, comes up to me this morning. like the syndrome, you stay here long enough start walking with a strut. alex corson, hey, call me acc 47. >> he's getting bold. >> yes! >> is that like a phil cavens thing? >> yes! >> i'm like, seriously, karins? so phil cabins? >> the baseball announcer in high school called him phil cabins. that stuck with him. >> think of all the things you've been called. >> i'm called that everyday. apparently i said something yesterday. >> what did you do? >> something about -- >> did you get in trouble? i don't know. i got a call from hugh hewitt. >> the radio guy? >> he's like, did you -- i just want to talk about what you said today. it was like 7:30 at night, the kids are running around, you know. i
congress. hear remarks from republican congressman jim jordan and steve scalise on the future of the conservative movement. they'll be speaking 3:30 eastern right here on c-span. >> belittle me. strangle me. >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us i think in this country, we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this if he none none that so many of us -- phenomenon that so many of us experienced one way or another and had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. finally people will starting to stand back and say, hold on. this isn't actually a normal part of growing up. this isn't a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. and director lee hersch and i started that film out of the feeling that voices were kind of bubbling up, coming up to the surface to say this isn't something that we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> filmmaker cynthia lowen gathered essayed and personal stories today i
this year in 2012. they did that today. amazing. joining us is steve clemmons. he writes at the washington note and atlantic magazine. steve is also a former policy adviser for new mexico senator jeff bingaman. thank you for being here. >> great to be with you rachel. >> am i being naive to think this was going to pass? >> a lot of people thought it was going to pass. of all the treaties, this would be the easiest to pass. there were other treaties pending. this is about people in need and it didn't. this is a branch of the gop that did you want represent all republicans, but it's the obnoxious nationalist wing that really resents any international deal making. there's a lot of worry not just about people with disabilities, but all the other treaties that position the united states and show that it can be the primary sculptor of global affairs, and we're defecting from that as of today's vote. >> so 126 countries ratifying this, but us, not ratifying it. particularly when it's modeled on our law. that takes us out of a global leadership role? >> it leaves a void that the united states is w
correspondent and founder of 15seconds.c 15seconds.com. lauren ashbam and steve who spent decades at "new york times." are the media now, finally, leading a national debate on guns? >> reluctantly and awkwardly. the way they got this started off. painful as a journalist for 40 years to watch all the mistakes. but carrying it through now over a full week clearly going into another week after this into the holiday weeks. i think the debate is off and running and i think it has legs. >> it seems like the reporters and the pundits, some of them, at least, finally showing the emotional impact of covering this. >> in the beginning you want to do the job you're sent there to do. you get your mind in the game. you find your cell phone, your laptop and you pack your clothes and you're going to be there for five days and you're in this bubble where you cannot let emotion come in. it's not until a week later, four, five days later where we're starting to see the toll it is taking on journalists. >> is there a danger as the media do now either lead or become swept up in this debate about guns and safety t
, thank you. i want to start with steve on this one. this sunday when given the opportunity to defend hagel, chuck schumer i just mentioned, refused to do so. listen to what this very smart senator from new york had to say. >> that's his choice. i think once he makes it, his record will be studied carefully. but until that point, i think we're not going to know what's going to happen. >> can you support him? >> i'd have to study his record. i'm not going to comment until the president makes a nomination. >> steve, i have a sense that this knocking of this candidate has gone beyond neocons, people of the right. and including people who are just generally pro-israeli which is about most people in politics. i get the fear -- i have to call it fear because i liked hagel, that he may be in trouble now. the shots that have been taken at him about calling it the jewish lobby which is a problem because obviously people are very pro-israeli from the right. to use that term these days is the kind of thing that just ends up causing a lot of problems with people in the middle politically. they'd
to bring this legislation to the floor next week. >> arthel: let's bring in steve centanni with more. >> as you can see, the two sides are taking strong stands on principle, but aren't really getting any closer to a compromise as we speed toward that fiscal cliff. the president hit the road appearing at a pennsylvania toy factory yesterday and appealing for a balanced approach, including spending cuts and new revenues. the president says we could cut taxes for the middle class right now if congress agreed to extend the bush era tax cuts for everybody except those earning more than 250,000 a year. he stressed the urgency of the situation. >> if congress does nothing, every family will see their income taxes automatically go up at the beginning of next year. a family of four will see their income tax rise by $2,200. we can't let that happen. our families can't afford it and neither can our economy. >> republicans, including house speaker john boehner, is staking out a very different position. they're demanding spending cuts to go along with extra revenue and they're opposed to raising
about israel and how many times they moved the red line. >> steve, the interesting thing about this syrian situation is there could be other kcountries that decide to act militarily or there could be a coalition that does this. it won't have to be the united states alone. yesterday we had goldberg on, your colleague at the atlantic, who reported israel is preparing, turkey is preparing. i also assume at this point the tax cutter, uae, the gulf states would participate in something like this as well. what do you know and what are you hearing? >> well, i think that's right and i think the right model to think about is libya and what you have in libya and what you may have in syria is essentially an atrocity driven strategy. in other words you get right to the edge of, you know, a benghazi wipeout or a potential real use of chemical weapons and then that drives the coalition response. i think it's highly doubtful that the qatar would take action but highly probable a calculation that involves turkey and thus nato forces were to take action if chemical weapons were to be used and i
:00 eastern, aman whose name is synonymous with the flat tax. steve forbes will be our taxmaker of the hour. it's a new day. if you're a man with low testosterone, you should know that axiron is here. the only underarm treatment for low t. that's right, the one you apply to the underarm. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these signs and symptoms to your doctor if they occur. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. do not use if you have prostate or breast cancer. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptoms; decreased sperm count; ankle, feet, or body swelling; enlarged or painful breasts; problems breathing while sleeping; and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where a
perhaps your message. we have two strategists back with us. one democrat steve mcmahon and republican rick tyler. rick, you first because you guys lost, and i don't mind saying this because i'm heartened by this. i didn't know it was going to happen. i thought the first debate, as i said clearly on the air -- the president said i was having a stroke over there -- i thought there was an opportunity to win if you stayed on that line, we can create jobs, but somehow you got into something else. what happened in this election on issues? >> i was telling steve earlier in the green room that i started to believe it after the first debate also. i didn't believe it all the way up. i was on this program being probably the number one critic of mitt romney, and we tried everything. we tried tim pawlenty and michele bachmann and herman cain and rick perry. i think that was inverted, but we tried newt gingrich and rick santorum, and we arrived at the inevitable mitt romney. >> you ended up with a weak candidate. >> in many ways yes. >> do you think any of the other guys or women that you passed over wo
and it is antiquated, i don't have concerns that steve has about the subject of 1021 be because i don't think it will be executed at way. by do think we need to take another look at it and we need to have more robust domestic authorities. >> this is going back to the cyberrealm. the question raises the issue of understanding what cyberwar is, particularly the context of cyberdamage taking place as a result of intellectual property. you know the national executive, issuing a report on spying and stealing intellectual property and more recently the house intelligence service select committee, a particular report dealing with two chinese communications providers while -- where do you see that? you in particular have been quite thoughtful in this area. how do you see intellectual property and the feeling of what is taking place and how does that rice in the world of cybercrime and cyberwar? >> this is a big problem. you have to be dealing with the private sector to see how bad is. the campaigns to penetrate networks have been so lucrative particularly for china and other countries as well that th
? >> steve, thanks for that. that's interesting stuff there. >> nothing like getting your blood pressure up. liesman testing you live on tv. >> what do you think? wrong, wrong. brought back bad memories, huh, carl? 2013 housing market outlook this morning, according to the report there will be an increase in new residential construction activity, and also recovery in home repair and remodel spending next year. robert, some of the stats are staggering. it's not just an increase in starts, you're looking for 950,000 starts. that would be a 22% increase. what's the primary driver of this? is there really that much demand out there for 950,000 new starts? >> we're looking for three things. tighter inventory levels, stable pricing environment, and low interest rates. so collectively, we think these three factors would definitely drive demand verystantially next year. it's been a terrific year for the home builders. we think we're still in the third inning, not the seventh inning. both for fundamentals and the stocks. >> is there a part of the market we'll see the most building? is it the lower e
and lori, steve and sharon in the library. it is a great team working here. i am very grateful to all of them. getting back to the system, caroline mentioned playing in the desk. it was exactly in the space underneath the desk, the and the whole system was in there next to the knee hole. decades later, it was described where the microphones were. >> if i could interrupt, the agent had bestial service in the secret service. it made this assignment interesting. >> his job was to protect president kennedy from electronic surveillance. [laughter] so he was trying to keep the outside world from listening in, but he was tapped to help president kennedy listen in on his own conversations. >> it was 22 years before 1984. >> that's right, one microphone was in the knee hole and the other one was in the cabinet room not far from the oval office. there were some drapes, and he put a couple of microphones in the drapes. in his oral history he mentions that he put microphones in the residence. >> the other question that this naturally occurred, is it possible to find any documentary record of a de
want to watch it coming up. how you doing? my name is steve. my family's lived in this neighborhood for years. recently, things got so tight we had to go to our local food bank for help. i lost a lot of sleep worrying about what the neighbors might think. that is, until i saw them there, too. how'd i do, steve? a little stiff. you could have done a little better. what? come on. you know, i have an academy award. yeah, but not for playing me. announcer: play a role in ending hunger. visit feedingamerica.org/hunger and find your local food b ban. david: take a look at this quote about romney. quote he wanted to be president less than anyone i've met in my life. he had no desire to run. now that is from his son, tagg romney about his father. he said that governor romney had to be persuaded to run by his wife and tagg. so company, what do you think about this? do you believe it? adam: if tagg wants back in on the inheritance -- [laughter] shibani: what do you think? if that's the case, then everything worked out as it should have in the first place. well, i would beg that his son is pro
from steve cook, head of the michigan education association was a guest on our program. the union leadership was working, meeting with governor schneider and he said no the last thing i want is -- i don't want to split this state the way they did in wisconsin and ohio. no no, no. i don't want anything to do with that. i want to work together with the unions. i don't want anything to do with this rumors that they might try to pass some so-called right-to-work legislation in michigan. they met for like about ten days and then on friday, the republican-controlled legislature forced through -- get this now -- with no public hearings no debate on the floor, no members of the public allowed to testify for it or against it, no members of the public even allowed in the state capitol building when they passed this bill it would make michigan the 24th state to have the so-called right-to-work legislation on the books. they forced it through and then rick sha nidor in a total turnaround, a total flip-flop a total doubl
, but those it behoove is a lot of us to remember. the incoming chairman is congressman steve scalise. he represents louisiana's first congressional district, and was first elected in 2008, one term before the wave election of 2010. he is known as a staunch conservatives, as is fitting. he advocates for the principles of limited government, as have all the other heads of the rsc. american greatness, limited government, and traditional family values. he is a member of the energy and commerce committee, and has established himself are still living conservative views to national energy policy, which may come up today. congratulations on a successful term, and welcome. [applause] we have a few minutes to ask a few questions, to get some thoughts from jim and steve about how they see the issues ahead of for the past couple of years. jim and i have gotten to know each other over the past couple of years. i have enjoyed that. we have seen a lot of stuff going on. not nearly as much wheeling and dealing as you have seen in congress. i am sure you have the scars to show for it. over the past tumul
teresa sullivan and steve case, the founder of aol. >> we have instructed the panel is not to say hello to friends and family, so i will do it for them. hi, mom, i kids. tonight's keynote concludes a series of discussions about the problems, prospects, and policies are running high skilled immigration policy in the u.s. this morning at the miller center washington d.c. office, we have brought to the panelists from law, economics, and the private sector to debate and deliberate about a range of topics related to high skilled immigration. our discussion was framed by which isng at s.aessay, available on the miller center web site. our first session this morning, they compared the united states h1b policy to the blue card initiative and the european union. gary friedman focused on the public's underlying immigration policy and concluded that immigration policy in the u.s. is reasonable and rational, given the structure of the u.s.'s interest group-based system of political expression. susan marcum of georgetown university's institute for international emigration argued, and many agreed, th
williams, remember, and pointed this out yesterday steve jobs told president obama, those manufacturing jobs are never going to be here in the united states. tim cook says, well, guess what? i am taking al company in a different direction. >> in many ways one of the things he did for me that removed a gigantic burden is that he told me on a couple of pages before he passed away to never question what he would have done. never asked a question what steve do, to just do what's right. >> so there was no wwsd. just do the right thing. now, here is where i disagree with tim cook a little bit. he said, here's why we haven't done this earlier. >> honestly, it's not too much about price. it's about the skills, et cetera. over time, there are skills that are associated with manufacturing that have left the u.s. not necessarily people but the education for producing. >> now, you see, i disagree with that. the skills are here americans can make these products. they can make them as good and better earn anybody in the entire world. we have a great skilled workforce
your crystal balls and tell us, the next 12 months, what will happen on this issue? steve? >> i am cautiously optimistic. six months ago, it passed with broad bipartisan support. with they came together on that legislation because it was important to provide sbrures with capital even though they said nothing could get done, something did get done. the good news people recognize the issue is important and there is a general agreement on the solution around high skilled immigration. the problem is is the politics and the economy and jobs have been prumped by the politics of immigration. i think there are four paths. one could be the pass the senate not be taken up in the senate. there is a lottery that would flult raising the overall level of immigration. if there was an agreement to include that that bill could be passed. a second option which is what the president has ind indicated he favors is to link high skilled immigration with the dream act. so it is a broader solution around immigration. the third would be to say this deals with the 50,000, this deals with a million five. the
have. how're you doing, steve? there are things happening in this country, and they are not being addressed. people are calling for blood in the streets. every time they get together, hate crimes against black people. the black caucus not standing up to them. al sharpton is not standing up to them. the trouble in plaque -- in packs like rabid dogs. what ever they are, they defecate on police cars and all of that. we do not have that in the south. we also have multiple weapons. if you do away with them, the progressives will turn them loose in the streets. >> thank you for the call from georgia. juanita from michigan. caller: i am so glad that the conversation is opening up to a broader area than just guns. this is not the first time this tragedy has happened. the entertainment and mental health, those areas, they are being explored. one that i think is kind of weary -- kind of a directly related to it, that explains this act -- this epidemic, that we are seeing in terms of violence, it is possibly related to the drugs that we take. the commercials on television in -- it is so disc
very much. we'll hear from democratic congressman steve cohen in just a moment. happy holidays to you. thank you for being here. >> you, too. >> later, we'll take you to schools that are two steps ahead of the nra. hear why they think armed guards walking the halls are the way to go, plus what the president does that makes his daughters cringe. we want wait to hear that. this is msnbc. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. if you're still having difficulty
: let's bring in the author of how rich people think. steve, the rich voted not in overwhelming numbers but they certainly gave many of their votes to president obama in the last election. now, the rich people in america are going to have to pay higher tax rates. you know the rich. you know all about them. you're with them all the time. you write about them. how do they feel about this? >> well, i think the bottom line is, stuart, that the rich that voted for obama voted for obama based on his social policies not his fiscal policies. i don't think they are any happen per about the fiscal policies than anyone else, except maybe the very very wealthy, you know, maybe the michael bloombergs and the warren buffetts. stuart: i think there's a distinction here between wealth, accumulated money which you sit on and which is not taxed, and income, tax flow, which is taxed. i think there's a distinction between the two. when i say the rich, i guess i'm primarily referring to wealthy people who have accumulated wealth and they are sitting on it. they don't care if other people pay higher tax rate
to happen. >> do you remember when steve brought seagate private. it was brimming with cash. raised the dividend next week. why doesn't michael dell pay out a special dividend and everyone is thrilled. >> fundamentals are still what? >> fundamentals are -- i mean, look. fundamentals depend upon a belief that the personal computer is going to be with us for a long time and is not that much in decline. ipad will not crush it. i don't know. >> why not redistrict some of that free cash flow and that cash into an area where you think you can attain real growth. try to recreate the company in some sort of significant way. >> i think that -- >> it's not easy to do that by the way. >> as rivals have discovered. >> maybe you want them to go into the pharmaceutical business. allerg allergen's weight loss business is for sale. not a lot of synergy there. you can't find growth in the personal computer business. it doesn't exist. >> maybe you could figure -- you'll carry it around on your ipad, maybe there's more synergy than you think. >> maybe he should take the cash and buy a lot of apple sto
steele is former chair of the republican national committee and an msnbc political analyst and steve mcmahon's a democratic strategist. michael, you're on the republican side and what do you think of that? the argument made by brooks which is more sophisticated. make your deal now while you can get something for it because after january 1st you will just be saving your rear end. >> i think he's absolutely right. i think part of that deal should include giving the president what everybody in this town agrees on and that is those middle tax cuts for the middle class out of the bush tax cuts. set that aside because everyone agrees we're not going to go after those. then it gives you some time and some room to really negotiate down on that -- what that -- >> we have to do all that by january 1st. >> and it can be done. chris, this is not rocket science. that piece is very easy to -- >> but once you do that, why don't you admit you're not -- you're going to let the top rates go back to 39.6%. >> you can do that but this is the kicker. the republicans want to see that they're actually going t
, come from two billionaire-backed nonprofits. >> jennifer:66%. >> steve schwartzman steve bechtel. these are guys worth billions that don't want to pay a penny more in taxes and they have the money to help retaliate against republicans who break the pledge. historically, they have funded primary challenges, ads to push the republicans to the far right on this issue. >> jennifer: okay so americans for tax reform has a pac and that's what they give to. those two billionaires. >> trade association technically but it operates as a pac because they buy ads and do a lot of the electioneering stuff that a pac would do. >> jennifer: while he's raising money from his allies, from these two donors and others, i'm sure. 66% tells you. he's also essentially lobbying for tax breaks for entities like general electric. >> that's right. you know, everyone talks about the first part of the norquist pledge, not to raise the tax rates but the second half of it is basically a promise not to cut tax credits which as you know, m
-sex marriage at the ballot box. joining us now to discuss is steve, chair of the gay and lesbian victory fund. great to have you. >> nice to be here, alex. s. >> so a lot of tea leaf read and arm chair prognostication around this. i am by no means a supreme court expert, but when i saw that they were taking up both doma and prop 8, question as to whether they would take up inform i them at all, it seemed to me a signal that the court was ready to make a big decision, and i just cannot imagine, especially when you have conservatives like john roberts, who maybe sort of a fiscal conservative and vote in support of something like citizens united, but socially does not seem to be as conservative as, say, scalia. that they would be looking at the ark of history and say they are ready to make this law of the land. your intripgs now three days after they announced? are you feeling bullish or bearish? i asked you this on friday. i ask again. >> i'll bullish. i think the court wants to get in front of history and behind it. it is so clear where the country is moving. there is a poll this morning that
gone crazy. joining us now is steve kornacki from salon.com, host of "the cycle." good to have you i don't here. >> great to be here. >> some republican-controlled states, including ohio and virginia are talking about making their state vote for president the same way they vote for congress and the legislature. which right now is set up in a way that dramatically favors republicans, no matter how people vote. is it feasible that they could do this? >> it is feasible, sure, because they have the power. we're talking about states here where you control where the republican party controls the governorship and controls both houses of the legislature. so they have the power to do it. the significance, i literally have some back of the envelope calculations. >> that's an actual envelope? >> with some calculations on it. i think it's worth pointing out. you have four statious mentioned, pennsylvania, virginia, michigan, ohio. right now this year in the 2012 election, the electoral vote count from those four states was 61-0, obama. he won all four states. if you get a vote for every congress
senior correspondent and founder of 15seconds.com. laura ashburn editor and steve roberts at the george washington university who spent a couple decades at "new york times." since nothing else came back looking back in our national history and not prosecuting paula broadwell for stalking or anything else. >> we were right after the presidential election, everybody was bored. and this happened during newtown or during the presidential campaign. it would not have been as big a deal. this was a timing issue. >> nothing else going on, remember how, you know, the stakeouts in front of jill kelley's house. >> how do they send 30,000 to 40,000 e-mails. just this nonstop, salacious story. >> yes, but it was great television. sex and espionage and spies. i mean, this was the kardashian of national security. >> that's not a good thing, pal. >> wrong metric. that was the kardashian impression in the worst way. it was to try to get eyeballs and sensationalize the story and good tv and good entertainment is not the same as good information. this was not a high-point political coverage. this was inhe
but some conservatives, ohio congressman steve latourette, has argued giving the president what he wants and reducing the debt by $4 or $5 billion. >> it depend wlats what the pac is. this is an administration that has 1 trillion plus deficits for each four years. >> one part of that that republicans have talked about, that 2%, and whether you're going to protect tax break force them. steve latourette said some people who call me, they're more worried about the fiscal cliff than about rates going up a couple of points. thomas rooney in your party, if there is truly entitlement reforms that's going to preserve social security and medicare for generations to come, it's going to be very difficult for me to oppose higher rates for the rich. what about that? >> and to mr. rooney's point, if in fact there were fundamental, significant reform of medicare, medicaid and social security so that we in fact save and strengthen and secure those programs, just like we did in our budget,those were included in the president's proposal, then that's something that we would talk about and very seriously co
it to a neighbor of obama's. he didn't know whether to say whether that note was ever delivered. >> who is steve rogers, who you also interviewed? >> he is a professor at the kellogg school of management. at northwestern university. >> what was his connection with president obama? >> like many african-american businessmen and leaders, whom i interviewed, he was an early backer and supporter. he was primary to bobby rush in 2000. the former black panther corpsmen. he went around looking for people who donate money to his cause. steve rogers is a very successful businessman before he became a professor. he had $6000, i believe, to pay off some of his personal debt. in return, obama promised that he would visit steve rogers students. and if he won the u.s. senate seat, he did win the u.s. senate seat. rogers never heard from him, so he called him up and asked obama witty comment, and he said, i am too busy. i am getting phone calls from warren buffett and from steve jobs and bill gates in all of these important people. and he said, but you, it's. and obama said, well, you know, promises made by pol
department public information officer, steve huffman. mr. huffman, thank you for joining us. one of the churches, trinity episcopal suffered a lot of damage. part of the roof is gone, front part of the parish is gone. and they went through a $1 million renovation. thank goodness it didn't happen when the church was packed. as daylight breaks what is the biggest challenge in terms of cleanup? >> we had public works crews working throughout the night and alabama power crews working to restore power in those affected areas. these guys -- i mean, unfortunately, this was not anything new to us. now, tornadoes are, but we're used to hurricanes, so we deal with power outages and things like that in emergencies such as this. our guys are well trained to respond to the types of incidents? >> how rare is it to have these tornadoes at this time of the year and nobody hurt, so you must have had pretty good warnings out there? >> we have been told a couple of days ahead of time to expect some severe weather to include tornadoes, and i think everybody was prepared for that. of course, we were
's incomeathome.com. >> bill: all right. before we move -- lynn, let's welcome steve. peter ogborn here. keeping on track of our social world. >> we're tweeting at bpshow and taking your comments in the chat room at current.com/billpress. just a quick comment from rusty cannon on twitter. we just talked about my2k, the hash tag he said i'm guessing my2k would pay the electric bill for my car elevator. >> bill: mitt may need that to pay for his. let's say hello to steve calling from hollywood california. hey, steve, good morning. >> caller: hi, bill. hi lynn. great show as always, bill. >> bill: thank you. early on the west coast we know. thanks for joining us. >> caller: great program. definitely worth getting up for. to me, if anyone should be invited to the white house for a very nice lunch and maybe get some kind of a -- it is jimmy carter's grandson for coming up with that 47% video. >> bill: oh, yeah. >> i mean you know the truth when you hear it and when you see it and that was definitely it. and my question is did
. >> congressman steve from new york and chairman of the democratic congressional campaign committee. good afternoon, sir. >> hi, martin. >> congressman, notwithstanding the fact that speaker boehner's office is considered mathematically dyslexic by many economists, has it surprised you some republicans have actually condemned boehner's office and would much prefer to keep taxes as they are and take an axe to social programs, medicare, in order to reduce the deficit? >> what's to surprising about that? for so many republicans, they said in the 1990s they wanted medicare to wither on the vine. you know, they now think they have the opportunity to do it in 2012. speaker boehner's proposal is based on the mathematical equation, two plus two equals whatever you want it to be. that's not how you grow the middle class. you do it in a balanced way. let's reduce the deficit we've already supported, $2 trillion in spending cuts, but let's do it in a way by asking the richest 2% to do their fair and grow the economy by making smart investments and things like job creating infrastructure. that's wha
. they have all of their products now being built in china and tim cooke, who replaced steve jobs and very rarely gave interviews, gave an interview to nbc he announced next year we'll do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. they're going to start creating some jobs here in america. >> bill: you know, that's a bfd. >> great news. >> seriously. >> bill: it is great news. we knew shortly before he died, steve jobs was at a very small dinner of high tech leaders with president obama in silicon valley and steve jobs says those jobs are never coming back, mr. president. stop talking about it. they ain't coming back. >> he was wrong apparently. >> bill: well, that was his policy and now somebody else is in charge. >> this is going to be building apple computers. they're still going to be building iphones and eye pats in china which makes up most of their business but this is a very good first step to bring jobs to america from apple. good for them. >> bill: i wonder where. >> they haven't announced where.
-- sorry, i mean bob has the answer. up next. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. tired of fees piling up introducing chase liquid. the reloadable card with no fee reloads and withdrawals at chase atms. all for one flat monthly fee so there's zero confusion. get rid of prepaid problems. get chase liquid. ♪ ♪ >> bob: you got to love ricky nelson. first, why do i get this segment? here is the way the producers said it to me. bob, when you come up with the story, please try to keep it classy. this is a story about something i know a little bit about, a strip jump. larry flint's hustler club. a guy by the name of william raned up a b
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